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Bee Balm Pollinator Garden

“Bee”-ing: Functional Horticulture

by MaryAnn Fink Pollinator Junction LIFE Exhibit/Curator Nature is the best design collaborator! Unlike me, She is able to work tirelessly! According to a most inspiring and renown sustainable architect Sim Van der Ryn, "since the "Back to Nature" movement of the 60's there has been a challenge to design "smart" rather than accept the romantic notion of living off the land." I believe we have do both live smart and give back to the land so that we can support LIFE. Isn't that really romantic? What does that mean for "sustainable" landscape design when we are clearly entering into a crisis of supporting an ever expanding human population with a dwindling pollinator population? This push to help pollinators may "bee" the moment in history when sustainable gardening truly take off and mainstreamers begin to understand what we as environmental horticulturists embrace,  the future is "functional horticulture"! I always want to be a promoter of an environment that

Wild quinine MOT

Pollinator Junction Day of Promise

A Day of Promise By MaryAnn Fink LIFE Exhibit/ Curator Pollinator Junction Today was a day of promise at the Museum of Transportation's Pollinator Junction--my promise to the park to make her a haven and hers to me that she'll do her best. The park is showing some inkling of all that is happening or maybe not happening where most eyes can't see! The wild quinine, a favorite of small bees and bee mimics has started to flower. Also the first bee balm flowers braved a windy wet day to offer her nectar to the newly arrived ruby-throated hummingbirds! Too cloudy and misty for much pollinator activity, but great for singing birds and laughing children! The annual beds are almost ready-third pitch and it's a home run! It's gone from flat gray mucky, gritty subsoil that was nearly dead and compacted to the point of airless, without any signs of insects, worms or aggregation to crumbly aerated soil with living and breathing activity. Below I've outlined my "new bed"

Coneflower

Busiest Pollinator Transporters

By MaryAnn Fink, Pollinator Junction, LIFE Exhibit Curator Who are the "primary" pollinators most likely to visit the LIFE Exhibit at Pollinator Junction Park? Let's meet them and nine groups of "primary pollinators," and their most recognizable ambassadors. Our pollinator "ambassadors" are good representatives of a group of pollinators. They are the most familiar, most efficient,  most common, least aggressive, sometimes truly unique or just the easiest to recognize "pollen transporters." These pollinators are also the easiest to attract to our flowers. They need a place to eat and "bee" safe in our landscape. These all can "bee" fun to watch and welcomed part of our neighborhoods! These "pollination pros" also do most of the work of pollinating! These are our Pollinator Junction's Pollinator Pantry Ambassadors: 1) Butterflies and Skippers, the ambassadors: Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) Silver-spotted Skipper ( Epargyreus clarus) 2) Nectar Moths

Pollinator park statue with MaryAnn Fink and Doug Wolter

Pollinary Park Butterfly Fairy Statue

We installed a new butterfly fairy statue in the Museum of Transportation's Pollinary Park this week. The attached photo pictures our very own MaryAnn Fink along with the statue (BTW, not the tall gentleman, he's Doug Wolter--the statue has the wings). We are having fun at

Ladybug on daisy Pollinator Garden

Pollinary Pantry Park is Buzzing!

Plan to visit (check our schedule here) our Pollinary Pantry Park on Wednesdays from 9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. when MaryAnn Fink is available to answer pollinator or general gardening questions. MaryAnn is also available once a month on our Pollinator Pantry Park Family Days from 11:30 a.m. - 1:30